The opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962, on view at The Liz O’Brien Gallery through Dec. 18

Events, Photography
Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery through Dec. 18. Photo by Lia Chang

Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery through Dec. 18. Photo by Lia Chang

Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962, currently on view at The Liz O’Brien Gallery through December 18th, is a time capsule of photographs by Mark Shaw of the wildly innovative fashion designer Tiger Morse, known as much among style insiders for dropping out of the fashion business than for contributions to it.

Mark Shaw's second wife Pat Suzuki with their son David Shaw, her daughter-in-law Juliet Cuming Shaw and her granddaughter Luna Cuming Shaw at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

Mark Shaw’s second wife Pat Suzuki with their son David Shaw, her daughter-in-law Juliet Cuming Shaw and her granddaughter Luna Cuming Shaw at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

Mark Shaw, whose photographs of Christian Dior couture and of John F. and Jacqueline Kennedy have been rediscovered in recently published books, was a personal friend of Morse’s. Mark Shaw and Tiger Morse ran in the same circle of creative high society. Both were clients of Max Jacobson, the notorious “Dr. Feelgood,” known for liberally supplying his celebrity clients (including JFK) with “vitamin” shots of super-charged doses of amphetamines.

In 1962, the year Shaw captured her on film, Morse was a fashion entrepreneur with a chic boutique, “A La Carte,” which opened in 1955 in an Upper East Side townhouse. Her clients included Jacqueline Kennedy, Jean Harvey Vanderbilt and Mrs. Harcourt Amory, Jr., which led to her designation as “the design pet of the jet set.”

The opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

The opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

The daughter of a prominent New York architect, Morse grew up in Manhattan and graduated from a posh boarding school. In addition to her background and design talent she had the advantage of her looks: the body of a model and the face of marvelous character. Early black and-white studio portraits of Morse by Shaw which capture her  exuberant spirit  and have never been published, are in the exhibit.

The opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

The opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

Morse traveled throughout Asia on fabric buying trips and, on assignment from LIFE Magazine, Shaw accompanied her, documenting her itinerary in brilliant color. In Shaw’s photographs Morse visits a street market in Hong Kong, rides an elephant in Benares, exchanges fashion tips with a Shinto priest in Kyoto and visits waterside weavers’ compounds in Bangkok. Multiple changes of outfits show that Morse was her own best model but Shaw’s fashion portraits of Morse’s clients, including Academy Award nominated young actress Nancy Olson and socialite Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, show off Morse’s singular influence.

Curator Alan Rosenberg, Mark Shaw’s son David Shaw and his wife Juliet Cuming Shaw, co-founders of The Mark Shaw Photographic Archive, at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

Curator Alan Rosenberg, Mark Shaw’s son David Shaw and his wife Juliet Cuming Shaw, co-founders of The Mark Shaw Photographic Archive, at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

The exhibition is curated by design historian Alan Rosenberg with the Mark Shaw Photographic Archive. The show runs from November 5th to December 18th 2015 at Liz O’Brien, 306 East 61st Street in Manhattan.

David Shaw, Michael Owen, Elizabeth Santeix, Juliet Cuming Shaw and her godmother Dolores Zaccaro at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

David Shaw, Michael Owen, Elizabeth Santeix, Juliet Cuming Shaw and her godmother Dolores Zaccaro at the opening reception of Tiger Morse by Mark Shaw: Jet Set Style Quest, 1962 at The Liz O’Brien Gallery in New York on November 3, 2015. Photo by Lia Chang

My pal Pat Suzuki, a singer and actress who starred in the original Broadway production of Flower Drum Song and is considered an Asian American pioneer in the performing arts, was Mark Shaw’s second wife.

About The Mark Shaw Photographic Archive
The Mark Shaw Photographic Archive was founded in 1996 by Mark Shaw’s only child David Shaw and Juliet Cuming Shaw, currently Director of the Archive.

The purpose of the Mark Shaw Photographic Archive is to preserve and promote the work of Mark Shaw through a variety of approaches, including: print sales, licensing projects, books, and exhibitions.

Since founding the Archive, Shaw and Cuming have spent countless hours searching through Mark Shaw’s vintage film and releasing images for licensing or for sale as Giclee prints. Additionally they have been involved in producing books and exhibitions of Mark Shaw’s work.

After years of Mark Shaw being known as the “Kennedy photographer”, with the October 2013 release of Dior Glamour, David Shaw and Juliet Cuming are looking forward to the rediscovery of Mark Shaw as one of America’s premier fashion photographers.

Based in Vermont, the Mark Shaw Photographic Archive is currently the only solar and wind-powered photo archive in the world. It is housed in an all-natural straw bale building that operates entirely off the electric grid. For more information, click here.

For more information on the New York show visit lizobrien.com or call 212-755-3800. For more information on Tiger Morse, visit TigerMorse.com.

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang attends the Dramatists Guild Fund's Gala: 'Great Writers Thank Their Lucky Stars' at Gotham Hall on October 26, 2015 in New York City.

Lia Chang attends the Dramatists Guild Fund’s Gala: ‘Great Writers Thank Their Lucky Stars’ at Gotham Hall on October 26, 2015 in New York City.

Lia Chang is an award-winning filmmaker, a Best Actress nominee, a photographer, and an award-winning multi-platform journalist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek, which will screen at the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival on November 21st. She is profiled in Examiner.com, FebOne1960.com BlogJade Magazine and Playbill.com.

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.
All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2015 Lia Chang Multimedia. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at lia@liachangphotography.com

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